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sarahf1984

Sarah's Library

I read pretty much anything, from fantasy (City of Stairs by Robert Jackson Bennett) to romance (Bared to You by Sylvia Day) to classics (Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad).  The only genres I don't read are self-help and comic books/graphic novels.

Currently reading

The Last Honeytrap
Louise Lee
Progress: 100/346 pages
Complete Works of William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare

Small Sacrifices: A True Story of Passion and Murder by Ann Rule

Small Sacrifices: A True Story of Passion and Murder - Ann Rule

9/6 - A true crime story of a mother who attempted to get rid of her kids because she believed that the man she was obsessed with would want her more if the kids were gone. I think this story would have been more horrific, would have had more of an impact on a reader when this was first published. Readers really would have been thinking "How could a mother do that to her own children?!" Today it's not that uncommon of a story, Law and Order has covered it many times. I'm not sure whether readers in the 80s would have been fooled, but without reading the back cover description and never having heard of the case I was immediately suspicious of Diane. Her affect at the hospital when she first brought her children in immediately said to me "All is not as it seems with this woman.".

The thing that most shocks me actually is the willingness with which the men at the Chandler post office are ready to put their marriages on the line just for a quick fling or one night stand with Diane. At one point Rule says that Diane's plan was to sleep her way through all the married men at the Chandler post office branch. The way Diane said it and Rule wrote it made it seem as if the men had no say in the matter, as if as soon as they saw her and she made her invitation them having sex was a foregone conclusion. What's wrong with these men that they are so weak?! The whole situation brings to mind Jedi mind control and the idea that Jedi mind control only works on the weak-minded. To be continued...

 

11/6 - I'm beginning to think maybe Diane didn't personally shoot her kids, that maybe she had a 'bushy-haired' accomplice. The fact that Christie remembered the 'man' coming around from the boot of the car, where Lew last saw Diane's guns. The comment Diane made about the 'man' maybe recognising her. The fact that the gun has gone so completely missing. The fact that Diane's car was seen driving at a snail's pace along the road where she said the shooting happened, an action which I think means that she was driving slowly while waiting for her accomplice to turn up at the pre-arranged location. All these clues lead me to think that Diane was working with a 'bushy-haired man' who took the gun with him after he'd shot the kids. I think this man might have been someone Diane knew from her past, but who she didn't think would remember her (not sure how that's possible, but that was the feeling I got from her comment wondering if he'd recognised her). If Diane had done the shooting herself I don't see how she could have managed the whole thing within the time frame - she had to get rid of the gun in a seemingly undiscoverable place, and she had to either wash her hands of any gun powder or get rid of the gloves she would've had to have been wearing to protect herself from that damning forensic evidence. Even then she couldn't have been sure that she hadn't gotten it on her clothes, so I just don't see how she could have been the only one involved in the crime. To be continued...

 

12/6 - First, thanks to Rule for mentioning The Onion Field by Joseph Wambaugh as another interesting tale of a horrific murder, second, thanks to GR for recommending it to me (because I'm reading Small Sacrifices) and therefore reminding me that I wanted to add The Onion Field to my 'to read' shelf. New true crime book now on the 'to read' shelf. To be continued...

13/6 - What an interesting woman, and by interesting I mean batshit crazy, though not in a 'raving lunatic' clinical diagnosis type of way (doctors said she had numerous personality disorders, but was definitely sane), crazy in the way that she must have been crazy to believe that she could murder her kids and get away with it and crazy to think that all she needed to do to get 'Lew' back for good was to eliminate her children from the picture.

I looked Diane up on Wikipedia this morning and have just spent 13 minutes listening to Diane's second parole board hearing in 2010, she sounds even more confused about what the 'true' story is than ever. She gave the parole board her story of what happened the night of the shootings and it's considerably different from the two different stories that were related in this book. She discussed having a boyfriend, who had never been mentioned before, who claimed to work for the FBI; she said that the reason she and the kids went out that night was to pick up photos for this boyfriend; she forgot the part in her original story where she faked throwing her keys over her shoulder in order to distract the gunman while she jumped in the car and raced off; and she made a slip (maybe a Freudian slip) when she said that the gunman had jumped in the car in order to shoot the children (previously she had said that the gunman was outside of the car with her when the children were shot, that he leaned through the window to shoot them). I don't think you can trust anything this woman says, about anything.

I don't understand why the man that she did this for, Lew Lewiston is the name he's given in Small Sacrifices, has a different name in Wikipedia, there his name is given as Robert Knickerbocker. You might say maybe he changed his name so she couldn't find him if she ever escaped again or was released, but then his name's there in the public domain for anyone on the internet to see. Maybe he asked Rule to change his name for the book?

I'm glad to read that she's still in jail and that as of 2010 she will not be eligible for parole for another 10 years, instead of getting a hearing every two as she had previously (2008 and then 2010).